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The Sonic God
28.07.2006, 04:42
If you have a political party, what would it be?

anything spicy
28.07.2006, 10:43
whu?

Dark_lion
28.07.2006, 12:51
I dont know.Im not from USA,so I dont vote.But if I would be from USA,I vould vote for the best who ofer their service.
Im sorry about grammar and speeling mistakes

Reepacheep
28.07.2006, 14:04
i am non-US.

Fiona
28.07.2006, 14:33
I'm not from USA but if i would be there I would not vote!

windrose
28.07.2006, 15:28
I consider both major US parties to be equally self-serving and corrupt and generally find little to choose from between either of them -- but that does not mean that I do not vote. As Robert A. Heinlein once said (approximately):


If you live in a society which allows you to vote -- then do so. There may be precious little to vote for but there is always something to vote against.

At one time I moved and did not get my voter registration moved in time so missed an election. It turned out that a very (IMO) stupid law was passed in that particular election -- about something on which I had very strong convictions. Considering by how wide a margin it passed, my single vote would likely have had little to no effect -- but at least my voice would have been heard.

nathalie
28.07.2006, 15:46
I'm not from the US.

But we have so many different parties over here, you'd need a week alone just to think about who you gonna vote for, haha.

Kirauni
28.07.2006, 17:48
There are actually many different parties in the United States. For a list of political parties I recommend you to have a look at the Wikipedia article:
Political parties in the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_the_United_States)

I found it rather interesting that there are so many different parties in the States. Some of them are really not that common and only restricted to certain states, but the variety of political parties is breathtaking.
And it shows that the United States really are a place where you have freedom of speech and mind.
Then again, the two-party-system only allows two parties to have a theoretical chance of winning. Therefore, many people think one should either vote for the Republicans or the Democrats.
Still there is a tendency that the "reform party" will get more votes than usual during the next election. But we will just have to see about that :)

Personally I don't know which party I would vote for, because from my point of view they are not that different. All right they've got different kinds of policies but then again compared to the major parties in Germany they are rather similar. At least they are based on the same ideologies. :lionwink
That's why I simply stick to the truth. I voted for "I'm not a citizen of the USA, therefore this does/may not apply to me." in this poll.

At least I agree with Windrose. It is important to vote if you got the chance to do so. Someone once said that "democracy is a system that guarantees us that we are not governed better than we deserve it."

Cobalt
31.07.2006, 06:28
I don't claim allegance to any political party. Doing that requires that you make a decision on an issue before you know what the issue is. If I'm going to vote on something, I educate myself on it, then make a choice based of what I know.

Jajaro
31.07.2006, 16:31
I'm not from US so I don't have any comment on this one.

The Sonic God
31.07.2006, 21:55
Originally posted by Robert A. Heinlein
If you live in a society which allows you to vote -- then do so. There may be precious little to vote for but there is always something to vote against.

Then in my counterargument it is my belief that in my 25 years of American education that not voting is still an act of voting. My refusing to vote, I have hereby voted against all parties, therefore used my right as a citizen of the United States.

In my future, I plan to allow the quietest voice to be heard throughout the world.

So, what's my party? I guess you could say that I'm an indepedant, supporting my own views and policies.

I still obey the law, though. Refusing the vote is not disobeying the law. And I do not believe it to be irresponsible. After all, I do have the right to remain silent. And it is also my belief that silence can be my strongest weapon.

Dark_lion
01.08.2006, 22:36
TSG you vote for the best for you.

red_lion
07.08.2006, 14:49
im not from usa

so i havent any comment

The Sonic God
07.08.2006, 19:23
Originally posted by Dark_lion
TSG you vote for the best for you.

Okay, I'll vote for myself... when I'm 35. lol

The only party that I really support are the ones with punch, cake, and ice cream. :)

Dark_lion
07.08.2006, 19:31
Me to TSG.Me to

The Sonic God
07.08.2006, 19:36
I've seen politicial discussions that are everlasting, neverending. They usually don't get anywhere because no one has a real solid opinion on how things should be ran. But a real party, say New Year's or even just a Birthday Party can almost always be enjoyed by everyone. Political parties should just be the new English colloquial meaning "to divide and separate." Peculiarly ironic, considering that the United States is about unity, justice, and freedom. lol

Mafriki
10.08.2006, 13:05
Erm, well ignoring the US as that's not the only place with political parties (I know there's an option for non-US, leave me be) I vote for the Conservatives here in Britain (I have no idea how Thatcher nearly broke the UK, it was technically before my time, so I don't care).

Why? Because "New" Labour is just awful. Tony Blair is a joke (gladly he should be retiring soon), but still.

It does simply revolve around that quote for voting against not especially for. As when I used to live in the constituency of Blaydon (when I lived with my parents) I voted Lib Dem as they had the better chance of getting that seat from Labour. I would still want the Tories to win though...

Now I don't know who's got the greatest presence here in Blyth Valley (I'm not sure if that's the constituency it just happens to be the borough I live in now :P). Still vote Torie blindly though :D

Oh the stupid complexity of the UK voting system. Why can it not just be general majority like other places? :( Then again those American tick boxes are tricky... ;)

The Sonic God
11.08.2006, 21:39
The voting system is a joke, period.

The earth's human population consists of 90% morons, 9% somewhat intelligent people, and 1% very intelligent people.

The very intelligent people make the right decisions, obey the law, and do what is necessary to maintain the safety and security of the environment.

The somewhat intelligent people are generally law abiding, but have a tendancy to make frequent mistakes.

The morons all vote for the best looking politician.

Therefore, if you are intelligent, your votes are wasted.

SpiritWolf77
30.08.2006, 07:18
Independant (as in, no party). I vote for whomever I like based based on their views. I'm tired of the Republican vs. Democrat 2 party system.

The Sonic God
03.11.2006, 01:30
Originally posted by SpiritWolf77
Independant (as in, no party). I vote for whomever I like based based on their views. I'm tired of the Republican vs. Democrat 2 party system.

I guess the bottom line is, the power to vote is a great thing... when utilized correctly.

It isn't just the responsibility of the voter, but the responsibility of the one voted for.

Kirauni
03.11.2006, 07:31
Actually, many people I recently talked to see things very similiar to SpiritWolf. They are tired of the two-party system and therefore I'm really looking forward to the next elections in the States. Maybe things are gonna change finally? Who knows... As for Germany a new election would also be very interesting. Normally we have two major parties as well, but currently they seem to fall apart and right now they are only able to rule together. Which, of course is not that amusing but still something very uncommon. Things are changing. Slowly but surely.

Well, I won't be able to vote for anyone during the US ecletions anyway, but I got quite interested in how things might develope.

And I totally agree with you, Justin. Responsibility really is very important and not just the one of the voter's.

Cobalt
05.11.2006, 23:16
I'm almost dreading the mid-tearm elections on Tuesday here in the US. I've spent a lot of time trying to research everything that's on the ballots, but it's hard to do with al the mud-slinging that has been going on, and I refuse to vote for someone or something untill I understand the issue/candidate to my satisfaction.

As TSG put it, "responsable voting." For me, this dosen't mean, who I thought had the better sounding name, or promised a bigger tax cut.

The Sonic God
08.11.2006, 03:51
To those of whom in the United States that I have offended by refusing to vote today: I sincerely apologize. But if you've taken a close look at the campaign ads of each candidate, most of them are attacks at others whilst glorifying oneself. And the independant ads are just plain attacks altogether. Kind of makes me lose faith in our voting system when we're left with a choice of "pick the lesser of the two evils." I refuse to partake in it.

"The problem is choice."